Reflections on Ranthambore National Park Rajasthan India

Ranthambore National Park

Ranthambore National Park (Photo credit: almasudi)

English: Aravalli Range inside Ranthambhore, R...

English: Aravalli Range inside Ranthambhore, Rajasthan. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Ranthambore National Park

Ranthambore National Park (Photo credit: almasudi)

Startled monkey at Ranthambore Fort

Startled monkey at Ranthambore Fort (Photo credit: ianduffy)

Ranthambore National Park - Ranthambore Fort m...

Ranthambore National Park – Ranthambore Fort main gate (Photo credit: PradaDearest)

Wild boar at Ranthambore National Park, India

Wild boar at Ranthambore National Park, India (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Spotted deer in Ranthambore National Park
Spotted deer in Ranthambore National Park (Photo credit: ciamabue)
English: Ranthambore, Rajasthan, Fort Jain tem...

English: Ranthambore, Rajasthan, Fort Jain temple entrance (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: A shot from one of the observation po...

English: A shot from one of the observation points inside the fort. In the view is the Ranthambore National Park’s zone-III entrance and one of the numerous lakes inside the park. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: Sambar deer cropped picture

English: Sambar deer cropped picture (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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English: Ranthambore National Park

English: Ranthambore National Park (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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We boarded the train at Bharatpur, where the station platform was being decorated by men who were painting the metal-railed, drop-ceiling with zinc paint, and using a cloth instead of a brush – no protective clothing nor gloves! When a train was announced, young passengers would run onto the railway lines and try to board the train from both sides, so that they were assured getting a seat of some description, even if it was going to be on the steps of the train! They had not heard of “health and safety” there!  We were on our way to Ranthambore National Park. This was popular in it hey-day with the Indian and British royals and a favorite  hunting ground for tigers. Our train journey of two hours, was interesting and comfortable, passing through the beautiful Rajasthan countryside.

Having seen two tigers in the wild at Bandhavgarh National Park India, we were hoping to see more at Ranthambore National Park,  Rajasthan, India. We were both privileged and a little spoiled.  Unfortunately for us, one of India’s most famous wildlife parks, Ranthambore,  within the popular golden triangle, was to prove a bit of a disappointment.

The biggest highlight of the trip was probably when a colorful bird decided to use Alf’s head as a perch! Although it didn’t leave any lucky symbols behind!

Anyway to properly set the scene, open this link for hundreds of stunning photos of Ranthambore National Park.

We were staying in a pleasant, rustic lodge, outside Ranthambore National Park, which provided a comfortable base for two nights.

We had three game drives, two mornings and one afternoon. We were in an open-top four-wheel-drive vehicle with naturalist, driver and up to four other keen game spotters. We saw quite a few exotic birds, including many pelicans, India’s national bird. As far as mammals were concerned it was lots of monkeys, deer and antelopes but sadly no tigers!

Ranthambore National Park is perhaps a bit touristy, compared to game parks in Africa, or indeed compared Bandhavgarh National Park, where we spotted the two tigers. We shall always treasure the memory of seeing the two tigers in the wild. Given that we did not see any more tigers at  Ranthambore, it is probably understandable that we were a little disappointed.

On the other hand, Ranthambore National Park  is stunningly beautiful, with forests, grasslands, mountains, lakes, wetlands and a magnificent ancient fort at the top of a mountain. Ranthambore is famous for its tiger preservation work and all the staff are passionate about the tigers.

Perhaps if you visit Ranthambore, you will be more fortunate than us and spot a tiger!

After Ranthambore, we traveled by car through the beautiful Rajasthan countryside to the famous historic pink city and state capital, Jaipur which was stunning and very special. The journey took four hours.  But that’s another blog!

 

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2 responses

  1. Pingback: Meeting Tigers at Home in Bandhavgarh National Park India – our best photos « Discover the Orient

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